Marita Tasse - CRS, ABR, SRES, GRI, LMC - RE/MAX Prof Associates |


For better or for worse, the kitchen is the most fragrant area of the house. It’s where we cook and store our food, but it’s also where we throw away our garbage.

 In this winter months, people do most of their cooking indoors, which can lead to an increase in grease splatter. In the summer, the high temperatures in the kitchen can cause garbage to smell and fruit to become overripe more quickly.

 Regardless of the time of year, we can all use some help when it comes to reducing kitchen odors. In this article, we’ll give you some advice on how to do just that.

 Read on for tips on eliminating odors in your kitchen.

Air quality

The odors in your kitchen, both the good and the bad, come in the form of tiny particles floating in the air. So, it follows that one of the ways to remove lingering odors would be to remove them from the air in your kitchen.

One way to do this is with the use of an air purifier. These appliances come in a number of different sizes and can vary in price from under $100 to several hundreds of dollars. Depending on the size and layout of your home, you’ll want to search for a purifier that can safely handle the number of square feet that you’ll need to purify.

One benefit of using an air purifier is that it can also help you remove dust and other allergies from the air while removing unpleasant odors. However, keep in mind that most air purifiers run 24/7, so expect a few extra dollars added to your electric bill each month.

Cooking surfaces

One of the most common causes of kitchen odors are the surfaces of your counters, oven, and appliances. There are a few ways to handle this problem, but the best solution is to take preemptive measures.

When cooking items with grease, oil or butter, use a splatter screen. This will help you keep most of the grease inside the pan and off your surfaces where they will later emit a smell.

It’s important to frequently wipe down surfaces in your kitchen and clean them with a degreaser. If you don’t have kitchen tile or some other form of easy to clean surface around your cooking surfaces, consider installing one.

Dishes and garbage

We get it, after working all day, cooking dinner, and finally sitting down to relax no one wants to clean dishes. However, leaving dishes in the sink is one of the leading causes of kitchen odors. This is also true for people who don’t run their dishwasher frequently.

Speaking of dishwashers, be sure to check the drain at the bottom for debris, which can cause your dishwasher to smell badly.

When it comes to garbage, it’s often better to have a small garbage can that you empty more frequently than a larger one that will start to smell. Try to find a smaller can that has a cover, and consider scented bags to help mask any odors that do find their way out of the garbage can.


Photo by Bence Balla-Schottner on Unsplash

Herbs, onions, celery and garlic infuse the carrots and beans in this soup with remarkable richness and character. This soup can be made with canned black beans, but we highly recommend using dry beans, cooked up with a clove of garlic and a dash of tamari. The beans will be splendid, filling your home with an irresistible aroma.  

This recipe serves 4 – 6. Try it and it just might become one of your go-to recipes.

Step 1. Gather the Ingredients.

You'll need:

  • 3 cups dry black beans
  • 3 large carrots, scrubbed and chopped
  • 1 large, yellow onion, diced
  • ½ cup green onions, finely chopped (both the green tops and the white bulbs)
  • 3 stalks celery, diced after the strings are pulled out and discarded
  • 1 small can crushed tomatoes 
  • 8 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 teaspoonful of mixed salt and pepper
  • 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed, extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped regular or Italian parsley
  • A few torn leaves of basil
  • 1 Tbsp. dried oregano
  • Coconut aminos or tamari (note: either can be found in a regular grocery store, near the soy sauce)
  • Step 1. Prepare the Beans

    To make 3 cups of cooked black beans, begin with 1 cup of dried beans.

    Place the dry black beans, a generous dash of tamari sauce and a halved clove of garlic in a large pot of water for an hour to pre-cook.

    Remove the beans from heat. Allow them to cool.

    Rinse and drain the beans, discarding the garlic. 

    Step 2. Prepare the Soup

    Mince the second clove of garlic. Fire up the heat under a large soup pot add a dash of olive oil to the pot with the minced garlic. Add and sauté the diced carrots, celery and yellow onion over medium heat.

    Add the oregano, basil, broth and tomato sauce. Add a dash of tamari and the 3 cups of drained beans. Simmer gently over medium-low heat for 30 minutes. Before removing the soup from heat, add the parsley and green onions plus salt and pepper to taste.

    Step 3. Serve and Enjoy

    If you plan to serve this soup on the same day, let it marinate for at least an hour, then reheat to serve. Carrot & Black Bean Soup tastes even more robust after it marinates overnight in the fridge.

    Serve with whole wheat rolls, crispbread or a baguette.

    To Your Health!

    Black beans are an excellent protein source. They're high in fiber, iron and folate, a B vitamin. Carrots are rich in antioxidants, vitamin K1 and potassium. Research has connected them to eye health and healthy cholesterol levels. Even the herbs in this soup are good for you. Oregano, basil and other herbs provide antioxidants and nutrients. Basil contains calcium and vitamin K. 

    Carrot & Black Bean Soup is perfect for cooking up for the family, to take to work, or to bring to a dinner at a friend's home. It's as nourishing as it is delicious.


    Most breakfast tables are incomplete without bacon in them. When you cook your bacon the right way, what you have is crisp, chewy and tender. Overcooked or undercooked bacon can ruin the taste of your breakfast. Is it possible to ruin bacon? Yes! There are some bacon cooking mistakes that a lot of people make without realizing how it affects the quality of their breakfast bacon.

    1. Putting cold bacon in a heated pan

    The issue with placing bacon from the fridge into a hot pan is that the fat on the bacon strips does not have enough time to warm up and render out. Once cold bacon gets into a sizzling pan, the fat seizes up and becomes gummy instead of crisp. For the best bacon, place the bacon in the cold pan and turn up the heat to medium-hot. Go low, go slow till the fat comes out and cooks the bacon to perfect crispness.

    2. Using the wrong pan

    Aluminum pans are the worst to cook bacon in. The best pan is the cast iron skillet when it comes to cooking bacon. The bottom of a skillet is heavy and so conducts heat evenly. This helps to prevent burnt strip edges or your bacon getting cooked too quickly. Iron skillets let the fat sizzle early enough and cook the bacon itself.

    3. Not adding water to the pan

    A secret to nicely cooked bacon is to add a bit of water to the meat and cover the skillet on high heat. The water will help the bacon to retain its moisture and cook all tender. Once you notice the water is boiling, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook till the bacon has that characteristic brown look. Adding water to bacon also reduces the chances of burning.

    4. Poor oven-cooking habits

    Stop cramming too many bacon strips into a baking pan and cooking. The best way to cook bacon in an oven is to use a rimmed baking sheet and put the oven temperature to 425 degrees. Line up the bacon strips and bake for about 20 minutes. Take the bacon strips out and drain them on paper towels that will soak up the fat and ensure that you don't have greasy bacon for breakfast.

    Use these tips today, and you will see a significant improvement in the quality of your bacon.


    Pizza is, objectively, the greatest food ever invented. It's portable, filling, easy to make in large portions, and (arguably) has some nutritional value as well. The patron saint of children's parties and companion to college students everywhere, pizza is beloved at all times of day. You can eat it hot, cold or--in the case of microwave pizza--as molten lava applied directly to the tongue. Perhaps the greatest part about pizza is the variety and ingenuity that have been applied to it over the years. There are twelve main styles of pizza in the United States, according to the pizza Wiki, and there's a lot of overlap within those styles. Today, we're going to teach you how to make three main types of pizza: New York, Chicago, and Neapolitan. Between these three, there's enough variety to ensure you'll never get sick of eating pizza pies (as if that were even remotely possible).

    New York Style

    People don't sit down in New York. They're either too busy or too afraid of the benches and seats on the subway. It's much safer to just stay standing. But even those who don't sit still have to eat from time to time. New York style pizza is designed for just a person. They come in huge slices that are thin enough to be folded in half and eaten like a sandwich; one hand holding your slice, the other hailing a cab or waving obscenities at the tourists. Now for making the pizza: Stretch the dough thin and circular, with the outside of the circle just a bit thicker to form your crust. Go light on the sauce. Ideally, just crush some tomatoes and season. For the cheese, go with a medium moisture mozzarella and sprinkle on some oregano and parmesan. Bake at 500ºF for around 9 minutes until your crust is golden brown and crispy.

    Chicago Style Deep Dish

    Where other pizza makers hide the sauce inside the pizza, Chicagoans put it right on top showing off the quality of the deep red tomatoes. This isn't a pizza to eat on the run. In fact, proper etiquette says you eat this one sitting down with a fork and knife. Here's how it's made: First you need to butter your crust. Sounds weird, but that's what makes it so flaky and delicious. Once both sides are buttered, load it into the deep dish. Then put a liberal layer of your cheese down, then pile the sauce on top of that. This one needs a bit of time in the oven to cook. 25 minutes at 425ºF and it should start to look done.

    Neapolitan Style

    The closest we have to the original flatbreads that came out of Naples is the neapolitan pizza. You can make it Marinara style (no cheese) or Margherita style (light cheese). To make these babies, you're going to want a nice thin crust (Remember, these were originally just baked, crisp flatbreads). Instead of sauce, this one will have olive oil and tomato chunks or no tomatoes at all. The highlight here are all the herbs and spices you can add; basil, oregano and garlic all tossed in extra virgin olive oil are what give it it's signature flavor.  



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