Marita Tasse - CRS, ABR, SRES, GRI, LMC - RE/MAX Prof Associates |



 Photo by Gerd Altmann via Pixabay

Booming housing markets are obviously bad news for buyers, especially if they're afraid they're about to buy smack dab in the middle of a bubble. However, there are also reasons why residents and even home sellers should fear housing booms as well. When a city or town undergoes rapid growth due to a major corporation striking it rich, it isn't all champagne and caviar for the everyday people who live in the neighborhoods. 

1. Owners Move Up Their Sale Dates 

Owners who want to capitalize on the housing boom face two major problems. The first is that they likely weren't ready to move, and the second is the question of where they should move to. Because housing booms extend far past where the corporation has set up shop, it's not as though owners can purchase a property in the next town over. To reap the profits of their sale price, they may need to move clear out of state! Add that to the added stress of an early sale date, and it's easy to see why sellers aren't always making out like bandits. 

2. Residents Face Increased Costs of Living 

When housing prices go up, so too does everything else. From insurance to groceries to entertainment, those with a steady income find that it doesn't stretch as far as it used to. So unless residents are planning to move to a cheaper area or they're about to get a serious raise, they're essentially left in a worse position. This undisputed fact has put residents in a tenuous position, especially if they were trying to save. 

3. Neighborhoods Lose Their Appeal 

Unfortunately, it's usually the same developers who are buying up property during housing booms. These owners are primarily concerned with how to squeeze the most money from the well-paid employees at the nearest corporation. And while this is understandable, it tends to whitewash neighborhoods so everything starts to look the same. Even the landowners who try to brand themselves as funky to appear hip the younger crowd tend to water it down to the point where there's little personality or charm to what were once thriving and close-knit communities. 

There's no doubt that corporations can bring unprecedented success to neighborhoods, but they certainly don't help everyone. The real value of a city or town doesn't come from CEOs, but rather from the people who work to build the community through its patchwork efforts. That kind of appeal can take years before it's noticed and appreciated and that's part of what attracts big business in the first place. 


Photo by Seksak Kerdkanno via Pixabay

Diffusing aromas in your home is a great way to settle in, relax and enjoy a fresh, clean scent that calms the nerves.

How Do We Know Aromatherapy Works?

Research gives us the scoop. Take lavender, for example. Research shows lavender

  • Eases nervousness much better than a placebo.
  • Raises people's scientifically measured mood scores and lowers distress, when accompanied in aromatherapy by rosemary and tea tree oils.
  • Eases restlessness, poor sleep, and other sleep problems.
  • Enhances "general well-being and quality of life." 

When it comes down to the science, aromatherapy passes the smell test.

Uplifting Scents

You aren't limited to lavender. Many plants and their oils create a mood-enhancing home environment.

Pick up some eucalyptus branches and enjoy their stimulating scents in your bathroom or home office.

Or mix and match, creating your signature scent, with a blend of essential oils:

  • For a natural energy boost, diffuse peppermint and rosemary essential oils, accompanied by a citrus element, like bergamot orange.
  • For a gentle uplift, diffuse lavender with lemongrass.

Experiment and enjoy the process.

Tea Leaves, Revisited

If you happen to enjoy tea, you have a ready-made way to subtly scent your home year-round.

Did you know tea aromatherapy is a thing in Japan? Japanese tea leaf warmers are called chakouro. The idea is to ease stress and sharpen mental focus, while creating an ahhh home environment.

Aromatherapy oil warmers work just fine for putting tea leaves instead of the oil in the shallow saucer on top of the warmer. As they warm and their scent is diffused, your leaves will gently roast. After many hours, this creates a remainder of rich, brewable leaves, called hojicha in Japan.

Tea itself is aromatherapeutic. Green tea, jasmine, or sencha are all delightful. Sencha tea, with its rich, yellow hue, is gaining many western adherents, with good reason. Enjoy it hot or iced, garnished with a lemon wedge and a fresh sprig of mint. The scent is deeply satisfying.

Experiment with fragrance. Enjoy the adventure. And come home to a sanctuary every day.


Do you know home selling lingo? If not, miscommunications may arise that prevent you from maximizing the value of your house. Perhaps even worse, you risk making poor home selling decisions due to the fact that you don't fully understand the real estate terms included in a home sale agreement.

Fortunately, we're here to bring clarity to assorted home selling terms that you may encounter as you proceed along the home selling journey.

Let's take a look at three common home selling terms that every property seller needs to know.

1. Depreciation

Over time, the value of your home may deteriorate due to age, wear and tear and other problems. This is referred to as "depreciation," and depreciation ultimately may impact your ability to get the best price for your house.

To find out how much your house's value has depreciated, it may be worthwhile to conduct a home appraisal before you list your residence. That way, you can analyze your house's strengths and weaknesses. You also can uncover innovative ways to boost your home's appearance both inside and out, thereby ensuring you can set the optimal initial asking price for your residence.

2. House Closing

A house closing refers to the final transfer of ownership from home seller to homebuyer. Thus, once you and a homebuyer are ready to dot the I's and cross the T's on a home sale agreement, you'll complete the house closing process.

During a house closing, all terms of a contract between a home seller and homebuyer must be met. Moreover, the home deed will be recorded, and the house will finally be sold.

The house closing is a key part of the home selling cycle. At this point, a home seller will receive final payment for a house and transfer ownership of the property to the buyer.

3. Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent plays a pivotal role in the home selling process, and for good reason. If you hire an expert real estate agent, you should have no trouble navigating the home selling journey.

Typically, a real estate agent handles all of the tasks associated with listing and selling a house. This housing market professional will help you promote your residence to potential homebuyers, host open houses and home showings and even negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf. Plus, if you receive an offer on a home, a real estate agent can offer honest, unbiased recommendations about whether to accept or reject the proposal.

You don't need to look far to find a qualified real estate agent in your area, either.

Real estate agents are employed across the United States. In fact, if you interview multiple real estate agents in your area, you can find a real estate agent who makes you feel comfortable and confident about selling your house.

Allocate the necessary time and resources to learn various home selling terms. With a clear understanding of home selling terms, you can avoid potential pitfalls throughout the home selling journey.


 Photo by Juhasz Imre from Pexels

Major corporations can change nearly everything about their surrounding areas and their effect on residential real estate can be truly substantial. The concentration of wealth in areas like Silicon Valley and Seattle has influenced even the most basic properties, causing otherwise unremarkable homes to be worth over a million dollars based on their location alone. We'll look at the patterns of residential real estate from the past and the predictions of the future. 

The Boom & Cool 

Much like the stock market, there's a flurry of activity in the real estate market when anticipation is in the air. Just the announcements that Amazon's HQ2 would be in Long Island City caused a major influx in properties both in and around the area. But the long-term effects for real estate aren't quite as extreme. 

Once Amazon switched their allegiance to Arlington, the value of the Long Island City cooled back down to its original levels. Even in the D.C. area, the effects have been moderate. After a year, Arlington saw some increases in value for homes near the future campus, but its mid-2030s arrival is causing some degree of hesitation for owners and developers. 

The Steady Rise 

The areas that see a steady climb are typically those that bring in a stream of businesses. These cities and towns attract diverse populations who contribute their talents and create a personality that others want to be a part of. Los Angeles made headlines for becoming its own haven for tech talent, creating the so-called Silicon Beach that spans through Santa Monica, Hermosa and Venice.

Google, YouTube, Snap, Inc. and Hulu are just a few corporations with offices in Silicon Beach. With San Francisco pricing even successful companies out of the market, the demand for luxury real estate in the LA area has increased due to the influx of well-paid engineers, developers and leaders. 

A single industry, such as oil or tech, can quickly raise the average salary to epic proportions. In Gillette, WY, a city dominated by fossil fuels, the average cost of a home increased from $236,978 to $272,100 over the course of just 7 years. So while Arlington may not have seen the immediate jump they were looking for, it may only be a matter of time. 

You can see prices being pushed up all over the country due to corporate investment. From Boston to Miami, it starts with the areas directly surrounding the area of the business before being pushed out to the suburbs and beyond. 



7 Crescent Way, Sturbridge, MA 01518

Condo

$184,900
Price

3
Rooms
1
Beds
1
Baths
CRESCENT GATE ADULT COMMUNITY CONDO WITH A GARAGE! Like new - this owner of 7 yrs used it as a second home. SO POPULAR IN STURBRIDGE - walking distance to shopping, restaurants and old Sturbridge Village! Lovely second floor south facing one BR condo with an open floor design includes all appliances, washer & dryer. Large BR, big closets and spacious bath with walk-in shower. Easy living with an elevator, garage, locked storage bin and several attractive common areas for your enjoyment - welcoming lounge with a gas fireplace plus theater room, game room with billiards, exercise & fitness room, full kitchen and space for gatherings (reserved), library, and a large deck in a natural woodsy setting in the back. Pets up to 40# allowed. The monthly fee includes gas heat, all the amenities, master insurance, all exterior maintenance & landscaping, snow and trash removal, water & sewer! VERY IMPRESSIVE!
Open House
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